One Small Step: What’s Your Twitter Elevator Speech? | Beth’s Blog

One Small Step: What’s Your Twitter Elevator Speech?

Tips, Tools and Tactics

Flickr Photo by wurges

Whenever I teach a workshop or give a presentation,  I ask the audience these questions and to jot it down on a 3×5 card.   These have become a wonderful collection of small steps, easy actions that can be taken after the training to immediately apply learning and improve practice.

Here’s one for Twitter.

It’s really important to fill out the information in your Twitter profile especially the  “Bio” field  where you sum up in a few words who you are and make it sound interesting.    It’s like an elevator speech.  It grabs attention and says a lot in a few words.  It should leave your audience wanting more, while answering the essential questions about your organization.  A great place to start your elevator speech is to adapt your marketing boilerplate.

Here’s some questions to help you craft that brief sentence for your Twitter profile.

1.  Why should someone care about your? When possible, leverage an emotional connection.

2.  Be distinctive. For example were you the first or only one to do something? Perhaps you are the largest or oldest. These distinctives help set you apart and provide credibility.

3. Don’t forget the basics. Who does your organization/endeavor benefit? How does your  organization benefit someone?

4. Finish with an ‘ask’ to follow.

It may take you some time to boil it down to just a few words and you may not be able to get all those concepts in the bio line.

Here’s a template to get you started.

[YOUR ORG NAME] helps [TWITTER FOLLOWERS] to [BENEFIT/VALUE YOU
DELIVER ON TWITTER FEED].

Some tips from this resource, How To Write a Good Twitter Bio recommended by Kami Huyse

Here’s a few good examples of Twitter Elevator pitches.


What’s your Twitter elevator pitch?

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6 Responses

  1. Thanks for this. I’ve updated our bio and now hopefully it’s a little clearer who we are and what we do. (Before we just had our “tag line” which is catchy, but doesn’t give a lot of detail)

  2. Beth says:

    What’s the link .. would love to have scene a before and after screen shot

  3. Mackenzie says:

    Very useful – thanks!

    Pardon my ignorance, but can you clarify what you mean by ‘marketing boilerplate’? I’ve never heard this term before.

  4. Beth says:

    Mackenzie: The basic content you write to describe your organization – the type of copy you’d have on your about page for your web site, in print materials, press releases, brochures, etc. Boilerplate is generic copy that you can use in many places or revise.

  5. Katie says:

    Very useful post, Beth. As a soon-to-be college graduate, I am quickly realizing the importance of things like twitter bios. It is all part of branding yourself and creating an image that establishes how you want others to see you. These tips also help to use on a resume objective! I will definitely be using the template above to re-write my bios. Thank you! I have one question for you, though. How long is too long for a twitter bio?

  6. Beth says:

    Katie: The field length is 160 characters — so guess 161 is too long! In this day of fast moving information and our pseudo ADD, it makes sense to get to the point, quick and brevity matters! Think of it as a puzzle.