Networks | Beth’s Blog - Part 4

Archive for the ‘Networks’ Category

Reflections from Stanford Nonprofit Management Institute: New Skills for a Complex World

“New Skills for a Complex World” was the theme of the seventh annual Nonprofit Management Institute, a two-day conference for several hundred nonprofit leaders sponsored by the Stanford Social Innovation Review and the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) earlier this week.    … Read More

The Networked Professional: Principles of Effective Online Networking

On Friday, I was honored to lead a session for participants in the TechWomen program, an initiative of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), designed to offer professional development, networking, and mentorships for women in the Middle East working in the technology and science sectors.    … Read More

Using Peer Learning Strategies To Build A Network

As part of my work plan as Visiting Scholar at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation,  I have the pleasure of working with  networks of grantees to design and facilitate peer learning exchanges on networked nonprofit practices and using social media effectively.    … Read More

The Networked NGO in India

This year a lot of my work as Visiting Scholar at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation is working with grantees outside of the US.    I’ve just returned from leading a training for Population and Reproductive Health grantees from India.  … Read More

The Collective Impact of Love

Note from Beth: I have the honor of leading a “Networked NGO Training” in Delhi for grantees of the Packard Foundation and have lined up some guest posts to supplement my reports from India.

The Collective Impact of Love guest post by Stefan Lanfer,  Barr Foundation

Martin Luther King once said “love is mankind’s most potent weapon for personal and social transformation.” There is a lively debate these days in the nonprofit sector about how the solutions to intractable problems depend on “collective impact” and what it means to be “outcomes-focused.” A new case study in the Stanford Social Innovation Review injects that most potent of weapons – love – into the debate.… Read More