Reflection | Beth’s Blog

Archive for the ‘Reflection’ Category

How Nonprofit Professionals Can Manage Workplace Stress Triggers

Flickr Photo by Brittney Bush

This week I facilitated a Happy Healthy Nonprofit workshop for nonprofit professionals hosted by CVNL in Marin County.    Before focusing on workplace strategies and culture change, participants go through some reflective exercises, including taking the nonprofit burnout assessment, identifying stress triggers and reactions before creating a self-care plan.… Read More

What’s Your Personal Craziness Index? Identify, Take Action, and Avoid Nonprofit Burnout

dishes

In my newest book, The Happy Healthy Nonprofit: Strategies for Impact without Burnout, the first half of the book addresses how nonprofit professionals can assess and become more self-aware about the symptoms of burnout and begin to practice self-care to avoid burnout.… Read More

The One Simple Thing That Nonprofit Leaders Do To Keep Inspired and Avoid Burnout

mike-photo

Mike Brune, Sierra Club Executive Director

Yesterday, I was honored to fill in as MC and interviewer for Darian Rodriguez Heyman at the Nonprofit Fundraising Masters event.   (Darian was welcoming his first child, a boy, into the world!). The event, a one-day conference designed to share the world’s most successful fundraisers’ secrets to success, most valuable tips and tools, and sources of inspiration.  … Read More

What Nonprofits Need To Do More in 2015: Embrace Stillness

The new year is always a popular time for all of us to take stock and see the big picture.   And, every year when the calendar flips over, we embrace reflection and setting goals.   However, we live in a connected world where we have gotten so go at being in touch, informed, and connected, that we don’t know how to be alone and step away more regularly.… Read More

Pioneers in Justice: Building Networks and Movements for Social Justice

Click to View Full Infographic



Note from Beth:
How do we build networks and movements around important social change issues.  A generative social impact network links people together through relationships.  They create social capital or value by making their skills, resources, and knowledge available to each other.    

Read More