Beth Kanter's Blog - Part 249

Dilbert’s Social Media Policy and Reflections from Palo Alto Community Fund Workshop

Influencer Strategy, Networked Nonprofit, Organizational Culture

As part of my work as Visiting Scholar for Social Media and Nonprofits  at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation,  I’ve had the pleasure to do a number of workshops in the area.   … Read More

Finding Balance: Our Relationship with Technology and Social Networks

Mindfulness

I’m just back from a few days mostly offline in the Point Reyes National Seashore area to walk along the beach and appreciate the beautiful views and nature.  Taking an Internet or technology break is important, especially if you live a constantly connected lifestyle.… Read More

Twitter Chats As Pre-Survey For A Training

Training Design

As part of my work as Visiting Scholar for Social Media and Nonprofits,  I’ve been working with grantees on a variety of capacity building projects – from coaching to workshops to peer trainings.   One of the grantees I’m working with is  The  National Summer Learning Association and I will be doing trainings  at their national conference in November. … Read More

Give 30 Minutes to Help Pakistan!

Mobile

I’ve been a board member of Ushahidi for 6 months.  Ushahidi builds tools for democratizing information, increasing transparency and lowering the barriers for individuals to share their stories.   It  was initially developed to map reports of violence in Kenya after the post-election fallout at the beginning of 2008 and has been used for many other projects, including tracking disaster relief efforts in Haiti. … Read More

Twitter’s Claire Williams Shares Why Literacy Is Her Cause

Housekeeping

Note from Beth: As a supporter of the work that the Sharing Foundation does for children in Cambodia, I’ve seen first hand the value of literacy programs in developing countries.   The Sharing Foundation started this Khmer Literacy program for young children of farm workers in Cambodia – that helped these children learn to read and write in their native language and enter school.     

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