Social Media for Nonprofits Conference Series Launches in SF | Beth’s Blog

Social Media for Nonprofits Conference Series Launches in SF

Promotions

On June 29,  I’ll be participating at conference in San Francisco called Social Media for Nonprofits that launches  a seven-city conference event focusing on answering the question:  “How can resource-strapped community-based organizations seize the opportunities presented by this new landscape?”

The full-day conference is all about practical tips and tools for fundraising, marketing and advocacy.  The day includes keynotes, workshops by leading experts and interactive roundtables.   I’ll be leading an end of the day conversational keynote about how nonprofits can embrace free agent fundraisers.

Speakers include Guy Kawasaki, author of the new book “Enchantment,” JD Lasica of SocialBrite, Susan Gordon of Causes.com,  Charles Porch of Facebook,  Darian Heyman, Susan Tenby of TechSoup Global and Kellie McElhaney, founding faculty director of the Center for Responsible Business at the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley.

You can get a $20 discount by entering the code “beth” when registering for any of the conferences in any of the 7 cities.

Event: Social Media for Nonprofits conference

When: June 29  9:15 am – 8:30 pm

Where: The Green Room in the War Memorial, 401 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco

Cost: $95-$125, including entry to the full-day program and networking reception, plus continental breakfast and lunch

Register at Acteva

A book party for book editor and former Craigslist Foundation executive director Darian Rodriguez Heyman, “Nonprofit Management 101,” will follow the conference at 5:30-8:30 pm.   (I was lucky enough to one of 50 chapter contributors.)

This is the launch event in a seven-city series, which is also touring Washington, DC, New York City, Los Angeles, Seattle, Chicago and Atlanta

10 Responses

  1. Apollo Gonzales says:

    I’m a little surprised to see how few, in any, staff from actual “resource strapped” orgs are on the agenda here. Maybe I’m missing a bigger listing, but this is the mark that conferences keep missing.

  2. Beth says:

    Apollo: Thanks for your insightful comment! I’ll let Darian respond about the conference speakers, but some of us have worked with “resourced strapped organizations.”

  3. Apollo-

    Thanks much for your comment and candor. Beth is right in her reply- just about all of the speakers have worked extensively with smaller nonprofits, including the 10,000 organizations that graduated Nonproift Boot Camp while I was E.D. of Craigslist Foundation, many of the groups Beth has worked with, Ami’s network at Idealist, etc. George from Do Somthing is speaking in NYC and has helped build up theeir efforts, and note that when I started Cragislist Foundation we had no budget or staff and were based out of my bedroom. Thanks!

  4. Apollo Gonzales says:

    Thanks Beth and Darian,

    Sounds like you’ve got a good crew then. Glad to see it. I should explain a little more where I’m going. I started in a program that didn’t have a ton of institutional support (although there were great champions who helped immensely) despite our size and we worked hard to garner the resources we have. I’m often approached after I speak at places like NTC or Netroots Nation by folks who have questions about the process of getting more resources (people, money, etc) and not necessarily about making the most out of inexpensive or free tools. Many of those people are not EDs or startups. My impression is that there is an intersection of at least two circles of people that are not getting what they need at these things: Politically Unempowered Change Agents, Budgetless Evangelists. I think the former is self explanatory, but the second requires elaboration. Budgetless Evangelists are the folks who get it. They understand the tools. They preach engagement and the practice it with passion. They know all the tw-isms, all the API’s, all the Kanter/Godin/Solis gospel. BUT they have no budget to implement the “free” tools to help their strategy and they have no idea how to wrestle that money from program staff or the media budget. These are institutional structure challenges, not developer or campaign strategist challenges. I always want to take the 10 or 20 people who approach me after these things and take them to a break out session without a powerpoint, without video, without microphones, and just listen and help. There is never enough time.

  5. Beth says:

    Apollo: I know exactly what you’re talking about and I think my talk might get at that – embracing free agents – and thanks for giving me another angle on it!!

  6. Thanks for clarifying! I agree with Beth (again)- looking forward to addressing both these audiences and more, and providing practical and tactical tips and tools to our audiences.

    Best,

    Darian

  7. BTW, sorry about the typos- iTyping…

  8. Beth says:

    not worries ..

  9. Auth says:

    Thanks Beth and Darian,Sounds like you’ve got a good crew then. Glad to see it. I should expailn a little more where I’m going. I started in a program that didn’t have a ton of institutional support (although there were great champions who helped immensely) despite our size and we worked hard to garner the resources we have. I’m often approached after I speak at places like NTC or Netroots Nation by folks who have questions about the process of getting more resources (people, money, etc) and not necessarily about making the most out of inexpensive or free tools. Many of those people are not EDs or startups. My impression is that there is an intersection of at least two circles of people that are not getting what they need at these things: Politically Unempowered Change Agents, Budgetless Evangelists. I think the former is self explanatory, but the second requires elaboration. Budgetless Evangelists are the folks who get it. They understand the tools. They preach engagement and the practice it with passion. They know all the tw-isms, all the API’s, all the Kanter/Godin/Solis gospel. BUT they have no budget to implement the free tools to help their strategy and they have no idea how to wrestle that money from program staff or the media budget. These are institutional structure challenges, not developer or campaign strategist challenges. I always want to take the 10 or 20 people who approach me after these things and take them to a break out session without a powerpoint, without video, without microphones, and just listen and help. There is never enough time.

  10. Beth says:

    Hi Auth:

    I like your term, ‘Budgetless Evangelists” – I think it takes time and agree it is institutional structure and culture issues.

    Katya Andresen has a great post about this struggle – thought the advice might resonate.
    http://www.nonprofitmarketingblog.com/comments/an_anonymous_letter_is_this_you_heres_my_advice

Leave a Reply