Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips | Beth’s Blog

Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips

Tips

Note from Beth: The Social Media for Nonprofits Conference is returning to San Francisco on October 11th.  I’ve been honored to be a speaker at the past events held in San Francisco and would be there next except it conflicts with a NYC  Measuring the Networked Nonprofit book tour dates.    If you are in the San Francisco area,  work in the nonprofit sector, and work on social media, you should attend this event.

Guillaume Decugis, CEO, Scoop.it is on the agenda and most likely talking about content curation tools.   I’ve been a curating on scoop.it for over a year and feel it is one of the best platforms for curators.   Guillaume curates content on content curation over at scoop.it, taking a look at the trends and tools from the view point of a professional content curator.  The agenda also include Lesley Mansford from Razoo and Robert Rosenthal from VolunteerMatch – as well as lots of timely topics.

Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips
Guest Blog by Ritu Sharma, Co-Founder & Executive Director, Social Media for Nonprofits

As Social Media for Nonprofits, the country’s only conference series devoted to social media for social good, plans its 10/11 return to San Francisco, we thought it’d be helpful to share three of the simplest, most practical tips some of our 100+ presenters have shared with the 3,500+ nonprofits we’ve educated and empowered to date.

1- Timing is Everything
With email, the guiding rule is that you don’t want to be unread message number 38 of 62 when someone gets back to work from the weekend, so the best time to blast your list is mid morning or mid afternoon Tues/Weds/Thurs.  On the other hand, with social media, your Facebook posts and tweets should be timed to catch people in their downtime. 8:45am when they’re on their way into work, 12:30pm when they’re checking their iPhone eating a burrito, 5:30pm on the bus ride home, and according to research, the single best time to post during the week is 9:30-11pm, after the kids go to sleep.  Of course you should experiment with your own unique base and see what works, plus bear in mind what time zone(s) they’re in and try out weekends.

2- Ask Questions
Simply put, if your tweet or Facebook post ends in a question mark vs. a period, you can expect about five times the amount of likes/comments/shares, retweets, etc.  Why?  Well, social media isn’t about monologue- it’s about dialogue.  So instead of just making a statement, ask a question and invite your audience into a conversation!

3- Become a Content Curator
Imagine going to a cocktail party and winding up chatting with someone who only talks about themselves, their work, and their needs.  Time for an imaginary call or text to provide cover while you excuse yourself, right?  The same is true with social media- as Kay Sprinkel Grace said, “people don’t give to you, they give through you.”  Your audience may care about your organization a bit, but what they really care about is the kids or animals you serve, and the impact you have in the world.  So try and balance your posts by ensuring at least half of them don’t just talk about your needs and updates, but rather about the issue you represent.  Establish yourself as a thought leader and the followers and dollars will follow.

At Social Media for Nonprofits, we like to say we’re not doing our job if our conferences leave our attendees inspired– our job is to inspire themto action.  The real question is, after a one-day event, what can you do differently tomorrow that makes you more effective and more efficient at advancing your cause?  Hopefully these three simple tips are something you can put to work immediately to drive better results online.

We hope you can us in San Francisco on October, 11th  or that you can make it to Austin 10/23, Seattle 11/5, or thereafter in New DelhiNYCSilicon ValleyVancouver,LA, and Chicago.

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter to stay tuned and tickets are just $95 for nonprofits with budgets under $500K, including access to the full-day program, breakfast and lunch.  Larger nonprofits can save $20 off the normal $145 and $195 registration fee with the “Beth” discount code, thanks to our great Global Partner, the Foundation Center, as can consultants and for-profits, which normally pay $175. Finally, there are a limited number of scholarships available for small nonprofits not otherwise able to attend, thanks to the generous support of our sponsors.

 

Join us and learn proven, powerful social media tips and resources that cut through the clutter of abstract theory and concepts and leave you inspired to action.

21 Responses

  1. [...] Note from Beth: The Social Media for Nonprofits Conference is returning to San Francisco on October 11th.  [...]

  2. zahib says:

    Good post, What stood out to me is “Ask Questions”. If most people learn to shift their focus on being more Monologue or statement driven and be more dialogue driven.

    People looking to change the results they are getting now have to embrace a different mindset replacing sales with dialogue is a great way.

    Thanks for sharing.

  3. Beth says:

    Zahib: Thanks for commenting. What a good point.

    And welcome to the comments in this blog .. looking forward to discussing topics in more depth. How did you discover this blog? Do you work NGOs?

  4. zahib says:

    Beth: @how did I discover this blog? I had the blog on google reader :-) NGO’s? sorry if I seem ignorant, but I don’t know what you mean.

  5. Beth kanter says:

    NGO = nonprofit organization

  6. zahib says:

    I volunteer my expertise for an NGO. It’s about sharing information about traditional science of earth energy and how it’s related to the human body. :-)

  7. [...] Note from Beth: The Social Media for Nonprofits Conference is returning to San Francisco on October 11th.  [...]

  8. Useful concrete tips. I’ll definitely use the info on timing, both personally and with my clients. And I use Kay’s philosophy – that donors give through you to enact their values ( I.e. to ” be the change they want to see”) ALL the time. I truly appreciate your posts.

  9. [...] Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips [Beth’s Blog] 0 Comments [...]

  10. Thanks for sharing these tips! “People don’t give to you, they give through you” is really an important concept–it would seem that if all your posts are about your organization’s needs, then perhaps you have lost sight of the mission itself. Keeping close to heart this idea of being an empowering facilitator between people who care about an issue and the issue seems like a great exercise to keep you passionate and in touch with your mission and supporters.

  11. [...] a post from Beth’s Blog, which talked about social media for nonprofits, the only conference dedicated to social media for [...]

  12. Veronika says:

    Hey Beth,

    I like the post because you keep it simple, which these days it is very important if someone wants to be heard and reach as more people as possible.

    I like the part about the best time to blast the list with people. I think the tip is reasonable, because if i look it at the point of one of the contacts in the list, my free time would actually be the time in the bus, the break at school or work, after dinner, etc. So, i think you are right here…
    What is also important is to respect your audience personal life. This way an organization will also become respected. The non-profit organization must actually send attractive messages to draw attention towards itself, which i think is clear to all companies and organizations.

    Thumbs up for the post!

  13. [...] "How to best make social media work for your non-profit endeavors."  [...]

  14. fredena says:

    Thank you so much for this information! I am going on my first (of many I pray) missions trip with a youth-centered organization and everything posted here I really appreciate!

  15. [...] Ritu Sharma, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Social Media for Nonprofits to discuss the Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips.  Sharma outlines the basics for establishing a great plan of action for organizations, they are [...]

  16. [...] as thought leaders in the social media world.  Being a “content curator” was one of the Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips.  Both Austin Pets Alive and the Austin Humane Society place a strong emphasis on animals they [...]

  17. [...] as thought leaders in the social media world.  Being a “content curator” was one of the Three Simple but Powerful Social Media for Nonprofits Tips.  Both Austin Pets Alive and the Austin Humane Society place a strong emphasis on the animals they [...]

Leave a Reply